Sunday, April 26, 2009

Sunday, April 19, 2009

A Yard Sale Addiction

On Saturday, there was a neighborhood garage sale in a neighborhood with more Mercedes than the parking lot at a Streisand concert. It may have been at or near the shwank Country Club of the South (real yard salers do not give away their prime locations).

--Our Finds--

Fun new friends, including a lady with awesome taste in books (we may be starting a book club). I bought two current paperbacks from her for FOUR QUARTERS.

Two blue glass candlesticks for TWO DOLLARS.

A pretty scarf for TWO QUARTERS.

A nice leather jacket for TWO DOLLARS

A twenty dollar BIKE.

--Thoughts on YSE (Yard Sale Etiquette)

-We followed one speed saler around to a few stops and noticed he was packing his car full. At one stop, he talked a man down from $7 (which was a SuTEAL for a Fisher Price playset) to $5. Then, once the yardowner agreed to five, decided he didn't want the playset after all. This type of shopper is known as the YSoB (Yard Sale Bully). Incidentally, the lady who sold me the leather jacket stood up to a pair of YSoBs. The conversation went something like this:

Spokesbully: We'll give you $5.00 for that t.v. stand.
Lady: No. Don't do that. I don't like that. This is for charity. That's a solid wood piece of furniture.
Spokesbully: *Stomping feet and snorting like a bull*
Lady: No, thank you.

I was proud of her.

-Yard sale shopping is somewhat like gambling. You put twenty dollars in your pocket, hit the subdivision, and hope to leave much richer than you arrived. Sometimes, there is gold in the hills, and sometimes, they seem to be overflowing with stuffed pigs in wedding gowns and gold, plastic light fixtures. There is something so much more rewarding about leaving a sale with a two-dollar set of candlesticks than checking out at Target.

-Yard sale shopping always reminds me that people are really decent. Families in this ritzy neighborhood spread out their crap, covered it with stickers, and invited strangers into their yards and garages. I met an older man spreading pine straw who had lovely landscaping, an older woman with twin puppies who was selling her daughter's stuff, the lady who told the YSoBs where to stick it who had the loveliest clothes, the sixty-something would'velikedtobeagolfer who was getting rid of his nice golf outfits. I love it. I love neighborhoods and remembering that most people are pretty cool.

-Yard sale-ing is pretty dang funny sometimes. Some woman was selling her shampoo (info-mercial?) for $400! There was, in fact, a bride and groom stuffed pig pair. One lady was selling designer kid clothes for $25 an outfit ($100 originally!). Crazy.

Good times, those yard sales. Good fun.
'Tis the season, indeed.

Aubs

Monday, April 13, 2009

Faith, Sheep, Circumstances, and Walking in the Dark

Faith is the art of holding on to things your reason once accepted, despite your changing moods. --C.S. Lewis

The opposite of love is not hate, it's indifference. The opposite of art is not ugliness, it's indifference. The opposite of faith is not heresy, it's indifference. And the opposite of life is not death, it's indifference. --Elie Wiesel

Faith consists in believing when it is beyond the power of reason to believe.
--Voltaire

Faith is to believe what you do not see; the reward of this faith is to see what you believe. --Saint Augustine
***

The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want
According to W. Phillip Keller, who wrote A Shepherd's Look at Psalm 23, each ewe must be caught and razored in the ear with the mark of its owner. Similarly, Hebrew slaves in the Old Testament, when choosing to bond themselves to a certain family for life, would stand at the doorway to the home and receive an awl through the ear, literally binding the slave to the doorpost of a house.

What does it really mean to say that God is master? How are we marked by Him?

***

Spring Break this year was an odd mix of family, travel, old friends, Easter, Passover, and thoughts of my personal history with God.

I was hanging out with A and she said something that made me think. She said, "Sometimes in relationships, you go through the motions even when you're not *feeling it* because you *know* the foundation of the relationship is true," or something like that. Sometimes, circumstances make me *feel* like I'm walking in shadows. I feel like I'm walking dead. The truth is that because of Jesus, I'm walking in the light. I am a.l.i.v.e. I was marked for darkness and graciously passed over for a mark of his Light. Sometimes, I think believers consider salvation as something to experience during death. Really, salvation is experienced every day in the character of Christ alive in us. I think it's easy to leave those things unrecognized--unreasonable love, joy, patience, peace, goodness, kindness, self-control, and faithfulness.

What's my point? I think real faith is only experienced when feelings and circumstances point away from God. Real faith says, "I'm experiencing bunk, gunk, and sludge, but I know a deeper truth." The deeper truth is that in Him, all things hold together. Even when I don't feel it or see it, that's the truth. Louie Giglio did a talk once about lamanin, the cell adhesion protein molecule. It's the molecule that holds the linings of our organs together. Check it:



Stormy Praise. Letter Catch-Up. Lanolin. Lamanin. Light.

Aubrey

Saturday, April 4, 2009

Heh.

Real Lessons

Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after. --Henry David Thoreau

Some of the best men I know fish. I've been pondering that a little tonight.

I read Julie Johnson's article Life Lessons I Learned While Fishing These things seem so much like real wisdom to me...

Here's the summary
Be patient.
A small ripple can make a big difference.
There's an appropriate time for everything.
"The early bird gets the worm"--or in this case, the fish.
Don't tell tales too big; they'll come back to haunt you.
Just let it go.

Maybe it's time to go fishing.
Ozarks. Passing Time. Love. Fish. Tamarind Sauce.